Manuscript Title:

ANALYSIS OF CLINICAL STUDIES AND QUASI-EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF PRIMARY DYSMENORRHEA: REVIEW ON EFFICACY OF GINGER

Author:

Dr. BARKHA DEVI, RANJITA DEVI, DOMA GIRI, SHRIJANA PRADHAN, NAZUNG LEPCHA, SHAKEELA BASNET

DOI Number:

DOI:10.17605/OSF.IO/BNH2J

Published : 2022-07-23

About the author(s)

1. Dr. BARKHA DEVI - Associate Professor, Sikkim Manipal College of Nursing, Sikkim Manipal University, Sikkim, India.
2. RANJITA DEVI - Professor, Sikkim Manipal College of Nursing, Sikkim Manipal University, Sikkim, India.
3. DOMA GIRI - Assistant Professor, Sikkim Manipal College of Nursing, Sikkim Manipal University, Sikkim, India.
4. SHRIJANA PRADHAN - Assistant Professor, Sikkim Manipal College of Nursing, Sikkim Manipal University, Sikkim, India.
5. NAZUNG LEPCHA - Assistant Professor, Sikkim Manipal College of Nursing, Sikkim Manipal University, Sikkim, India.
6. SHAKEELA BASNET - Assistant Professor, Sikkim Manipal College of Nursing, Sikkim Manipal University, Sikkim, India.

Full Text : PDF

Abstract

Introduction: Primary dysmenorrhea, which induces suffering in young women, is often accompanied by several other symptoms that can disrupt their life. It is one of the most well-known gynecological issues, impairing women's productivity and leading in 34 percent to 50 percent of school and job absences. Ginger is a very well herb which has traditionally been used to relieve inflammatory illnesses' symptoms. Ginger powder has proven to be effective in lowering menstruation discomfort when taken during the first three to four days of the menstruation.

Materials and methods: Following the PRISMA methodology, extensive search methods for ginger and pain with or without length of menstruation symptoms together with a trial filter for quasi-experimental studies, randomized or controlled clinical trials were used to explore numerous databases between 2005 and 2022. The search terms were "ginger" primary dysmenorrhea, "dysmenorrhea," "non-pharmacology therapies," and "menstrual pain for selecting articles." Trials testing the efficacy of ginger comparing to placebo, pharmaceutical treatment, or non-pharmacological, complementary therapy in women suffering from primary dysmenorrhea used as an oral treatment were included.

Results: There have been 13 clinical trials extracted, which included five studies showing ginger to placebo, three research papers trying to compare ginger to a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), two studies trying to compare ginger to vitamins, two studies comparing ginger to exercise, and one study comparing ginger to pineapple juice. Conclusion: Ginger was found to be more beneficial than placebo, exercise, vitamins, and pineapple juice in reducing pain intensity, as well as being similarly efficacious in decreasing menstrual cramps and length when combined with a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory medicine (NSAID). Due to the heterogeneity of the studies, it was not possible to perform metaanalysis. The findings of this evaluation approach show that ginger in any form, can help with primary dysmenorrhea.


Keywords

primary dysmenorrhea, ginger, menstrual pain, non-pharmacology methods, dysmenorrhea.